Pocket Watch Database

The Timekeeper: The Hamilton Watch (1911 Catalog)

THE TIMEKEEPER HAMILTON‘WATCH' COMPANY LANCASTER ' PENNA. ' U. S. A. TO - THE- RAILROAD - MEN - OF AMERICA-THAT,MOST~EFFICIENT BODY - OF ~MEN-W H O - HAVE - MADE KNOWN~THE-SUPREME -EXCELLENCE OF-THE-HAMILTON-WATCH-THIS BOOK- IS ~GRATEFULLY- DEDICATED. 1 THE TIMEKEEPER PART I NM“ HE most important function of a watch is to keep time. A watch is incidentally valuable as an ornament, asjewelry, as a possession of real, tangible, cash-able value. But its primary purpose is to tell the time, and it follows quite naturally that the m o r e reliable a watch is as a timekeeper, the m o r e valuable it is as a watch. The best watch, then, is the one which is the most dependable timekeeper. Nobodyreallyprefersapoorwatchtoagoodone, What3Watch and nobody who can own a watch will choose to get Is For along without one. Some men are required by the exigencies of their business to carry watches that are remarkably accu‐ rate. With such men Correct Time is the most important factor in their lives. The mere idea that their watch was “off” by gaining or losing to an unreasonable extent, would be so disquieting that they could not do their best work. '7 Accuracy Paramount to Everyone Yet men of this class‐railroad and professional men, navigators, engineers and men engaged in scien‐ tific research work, etc.‐‐are only a small per cent. of the enormous number of people who want abso‐ lutely accurate time. It is n o t the value of time that makes people want their watches accurate. No matter how much money per minute the time of a business m a n might be worth, he would lose nothing in efiiciency by having a watch that was three seconds fast. The reason for wanting an accurate timekeeper strikes deeper than that. For awatch actually has adirect psychological efiect on the individual who carries it. The old custom of presenting a youth approach‐ ing maturity With a fine watch is a good one‐not because it “teaches him the value of time,” but be‐ cause it gives him a companion with qualities so admirable that he w0uld do well to emulate them. There is undoubtedly a closer relationship between a man and his watch than between man and any other inanimate object. He carries it in his pocket day after day and year after year. Many a man sleeps with his watch under his pillow. It is the last thing he sees at night and the first thing he looks at in the morning. Hardly any important step is taken at any time during the day or night without first consulting his watch. All men are more or less 8 A Watch as a Companion methodical, and the tendency of every man is to live by his watch. Sentiment quickly at‐ taches itself to such a posses‐ sion. What then is more natural than for a man to want his watch to Ibe not merely fairly accurate, but very accurate? A reliable watch may n o t always mean a reliable man, but it certainly does mean that a m a n who carries such a watch admires reliability and desires that quality in the things with which he is associated. A l l jewelers and watch‐ makers have met that type of man known as the “time crank.” The “time crank” becomes irritated if his watch picks up or loses as much as five seconds per week, while positions of the greatest im‐ portance permit a variation of 20 seconds per week. There are some people who cannot 9 Not Fairly but Very Accurate understand how he would know that his watch was off five seconds. Here is how closely the “time crank” watches his time. In the first place, he takes Setting a his watch to a jeweler and has it set right to the Watch second‐something which it is always safer to let a jeweler do. When the hands of his watch are set to point exactly at, say, twelve o’clock, the seconds handismovedaroundtothetopalso,sothatit points Hamiltons for to “60.” The watch is started with all hands exactly ‘‘Time in place. Mr. “Time Crank ” Crank” generally hies him‐ self to his jeweler and compares time. If he finds too great a variation he demands that his watch be m o r e closely adjusted. It is an interesting fact that most “time cranks” seem to gravitate to the posses‐ sion of a Hamilton Time‐ keeper. However, not all of us have the time to be “time cranks.” Generally t h e “time crank” is not a man in whose life a second amounts to any prominent IO value. More often he is an old man retired from active business, but always he is a man whose “word is asgood ashis bond.” Nevertheless, we want o u r watches to be so accu‐ rate that it will not be necessary to be constantly confirming their time; or like the watch which Cap‐ tain Cuttle gave to “Wal’r Gay,” “Set her up fifteen minutes in the morning and another twenty minutes along in the afternoon, and it’s a watch that’ll do you credit.” Originally The Hamilton Timekeeper was originally a rail‐ for Railroad road watch made for the use of railroad men. The Use first Hamilton Timekeeper was begun in the early spring of the year 1892 and completed late in the fall of the same year. The fourth Hamilton Time‐ keeper to be made was purchased by Mr. Edvs'fin Paul, a conductor on the Pennsylvania Railroad, and if you were to ride from Philadelphia to Harris‐ burg, Pa., to-day on Mr. Paul’s train, you would be running on the time of that same Hamilton Time‐ keeper. The growth of the popularity of the Hamilton Timekeeper as a railroad watch was in a direct ratio to the tendency of railroads to r u n trains on a closer schedule of time. From two or ‘three minutes to twelve, or two or three minutes after twelve, passing fairly well for 11 Schedules twelve o’clock, the variance contracted to a matter A r e of minutes and fractions of a minute. Where trains Closer were once run five minutes or more apart, they are Because Watches Are Better now r u n t w o minutes apart and sometimes less. To-day trainmen figure down to the seconds in timing their runs, and the railroad man’s watch that gains or loses as much as three or four seconds per day is in danger of being “condemned” by the authorized Watch Inspector and ordered o u t of service f o r read‐ justment. The Hamilton Timekeeper became more and more favored among railroad men n o t by advertising n o r by aggressive selling methods, but because, in every group of trainmen, the men who carried Hamilton Watches gradually became the authority on time and othermensettheirwatchesbyHamiltontime. Quite naturally, when one of these other men got ready to buy a watch, he remembered the name “Hamilton” on the watch which he had begun to recognize as the standard timekeeper, and so he bought a Hamilton. In this way it became known as“The Railroad Time‐ keeper of America” and to-day 56 per cent. of the railroad men of America carry Hamilton Time‐ keepers. Until comparatively recent years, railroad men took almost the entire Output of Hamilton Watches, but every year the general public began to take 12 more Hamilton Timekeepers. Jewelers were, of course, acquainted with the Hamilton, and a great many jewelers began to carry Hamilton Timekeepers for their personal use. Then often when some man insisted that he wanted an unusually good watch, jewelers his jeweler would recommend the Hamilton Time‐ Knew keeper. Men who you would think had no real use for a phenomenally correct and precise watch began to buy the Hamilton, and it soon developed that a large part of the general public was just as particu‐ lar about always having the right time as anybody else. Now it's just as practicable to make an accurate small American watch as it is to make a dependable What an large watch. By “American watch” is m e a n t a watch “American made by American methods. American watchmaking differs considerably from Continental watchmaking in that n o t only is every piece of the watch made by machinery, but the very machines which make the parts are also machine-made and are so closely adjustedthatavarianceof a1/10,000partof aninch is made practically impossible, as the extreme of accuracy is necessary for final adjustment and in order to have interchangeable parts. For railroad use and similar purposes the larger watches are preferred, not because they admit of any closer adjustment, but because they are built heavy and their larger dials with bold figures and large black hands enable one to determine the time more quickly at a greater distance from the eye‐‐ especiallym a dim light. So that when the Hamilton Watch Company realized that the public was quite as much interested in the Hamilton Timekeeper as railroad men were, it was decided to make a Hamilton Watch with all the accuracy which the name Hamilton implies, but in a size and weight to meet the Wishes of men in all walks of life; for their requirements we have con‐ structed o u r 1 2 - and I6-size watches. A Iz-size watch is about three-fourths aslarge as the 18-size, which is the size most generally in use 14 Watch " in The 12-Size among railroad and other technical men. The Hamilton Iz-size is the thinnest Iz-size watch made in America, and in the Opinion of thousands of retail jewelers who are familiar with all kinds of watches, the Hamilton Iz-size is the most phenom‐ enally accurate timekeeper of its size. A slightly larger timekeeper, the Hamilton 16-size -‐-about midway in size between the “12” and the “18”‐‐has been made for years, and is also im‐ mensely popular with men who work on close time schedules. This I6-size was the Hamilton which, before and The 16-Size also since the advent of the Iz-size, was so enthusias‐ tically recommended by jewelers to customers who had sought their advice. The Hamilton 1 2 - and 16-size Timekeepers are beautiful. They have the distinctive dial figures and the slim, aristocratic hands which make the Hamilton Timekeeper recognizable even before the n a m e “Hamilton” is noted on the dial. Hamilton Timekeepers are now made in twenty‐ Twenty-three three different grades, which embrace all sizes from Blitz; the small Lady Hamilton to the I8-size, favored of railroad men. A complete, concise description of these watches will be found in the catalogue section of this book‐pages 31 to 45. The difference between American watches and 15 Hand-Made Watches foreign makes, which has been touched on above, is worthy of a more extended exposition, as a knowledge of this kind is always worth something to the man who is considering the purchase of a watch. In all Hamilton Time‐ keepers of the same size and grade the parts are inter‐ changeable. This is not true of Swiss watches, because the individual work on each one precludes interchange‐ ability, and makes satisfac‐ tory repairs very diflicult and therefore very expen‐ sive. The Hamilton Time‐ keeper has this advantage not only over foreign watches, but also over most American makes. The Hamilton watch‐ makers do not make low‐ priced watches one day and fine timekeepers the next. 16 Every piece of work that is done is done well enough to pass an inspection that is always r i g i d ‐ not flexible to admit the passing of inexpensive work. This insures that each and every watchmaker is always doing his very best, because he knows that there is. never occasion for cheap work in the Hamil‐ ton factory. All their training is towards the manufacture and assembling of the best timeke-epers possible to produce. Expert watchmakers are as well known to the Rare difl'erent watch factories as expert steel engravers Workman are to the United States Secret Service Bureau. The man who can true a hairspring cannot hide his light under a bushel. There are only about twelve really good hairspring truers in America, and more than half of these are working for the Hamilton Watch Company. It takes from seven months to a year to make a It Hamilton Timekeeper. The average time required Takes is nine months. No watch is ever made in less than Time seven months, and two months of this time alone is consumed in the “assembling” or “finishing” room. Here all the more delicate parts are weighed on scales so delicate that they are made on the premises, no other scales being considered quite so t r u s t ‐ worthy asthose which the Hamilton Company make I7 themselves. The micrometers, too, are also made by the HamiltonWatch Company, asispractically every piece of machinery and tool used in watch construc‐ tion. The gauges by which the finer parts are tested for size are kept in an exactly even temperature all the year around, and are handled with tweezers in order that the heat of the hands may not expand them, even unto the twenty-thousandth part of an inch. Statements with regard to the accuracy of the Hamilton Timekeeper can best be indicated in terms of “beats.” Every backward or forward t u r n of the Beat: and balance wheel is a beat. There are five beats to a Seconds second, and with a magnifying glass over the seconds hand of a Hamilton Timekeeper one can count all five of these beats as the hand moves a second. A HamiltOn watch makes I 57,680,000 beats in a year. It is interesting in this connection to note that a watch which may lose fifteen or twenty beats per month during the summer, when the owner of the watch is 18 engaged in more energetic pursuits, will promptly begin to pick up as cold weather advances and the individual settles down to a more sedentary life. Thus, on the whole, the watch, considered from the end of one year to the end of the next, will be found pretty accurate at any given time. One Timekeeper, of which the Hamilton people have a record, varied One but ten seconds in fourteen months; and another Watch’s Record Hamilton, used in traveling all over Europe, stood all the shock of travel for seventy-two days and Wfiati; meantéy‘‘compensatingbalanceand-agé'ust‐ ment to lzeat, cold, zmc/zronmn andfive parn‘zonr.” Such phenomenal accuracy as this is largely regu‐ lated by what is known as the “compensation bal‐ ance,” which means building the balance wheel out of an outer rim of brass and an inner rim of steel, 19 Brass and Metal Balance Heat and Cold Isochronism fused together. The brass and steel respond to heat and cold in a vastly different manner, and the con‐ traction or expansion in each metal is compensated for by the corresponding action of the other metal With which it is fused. Hamilton Timekeepers are adjusted to varying conditions of heat and cold. From a refrigerator, at a temperature of 31 degrees, they are moved to a hot box at 1 2 0 degrees. When they are accurate under both conditions, they are then passed to the next adjustment, namely, isochronism. This means that the movement of the balance must be so regu‐ lated that a watch will n o t be inclined to r u n faster one hour after it is wound up than it will twenty-four hours afterwards. This adjustment is obtained by regulating the backward and forward stroke of the balance wheel, so that the faster the wheel moves the longer stroke it takes, and the slower it moves the shorter stroke it takes. Adjustment to five positions takes into considera‐ tion every position in which a watch is liable to find itself during normal service. The five positions are: (1) dial up, or flat on its back; (2) back up, or flat on its face; (3) “12” up, or in the position a watch naturally takes in the pocket; (4) “3” up, or as the watch might be if it slipped over to the right in thepocket;and(5)“9”up,orasitwouldbeif the 20 Five Positions watch slipped over to the left in the pocket. It is this minuteness of adjust‐ ment which makes watch‐ making more difiicult than clockmaking, since a clock is adjusted to only the one position of “12” up. A ship’s chronometer, which is the closest form of timekeeper known, is ad‐ justed only to the “dial up” position, which is the simplest of all. And yet there are hun‐ dreds of jewelers who use a Hamilton Timekeeper as a chronometer. words, they rely upon the Hamilton for the abso‐ lutely accurate time which a jeweler is supposed to have on hand. Only three hundred to three hundred and fifty N“ .. Many Hamilton Timekeepers are made each day‐never Hamflmm more than the latter number. Over seven hundred and fifty of the best skilled workmen are regularly employed in the making of the parts and the construction of these watches. This country will never be “flooded” with 21 In other Hamilton Timekeepers‐you will never be able to buy them just anywhere. Now, if you decide to buy a Hamilton Time‐ keeper, set your mind at case on all questions of regulation,adjustment,guarantee,etc. Everyjeweler who can sell a Hamilton can also adjust it to your personal habits. . As for a guarantee‐we supplement the very glad to give, withiour personal guarantee, which As for Guarantee broad guarantee, which every Hamilton jeweler is accompanies every Timekeeper that leaves factory. HOW A HAMILTON TIMEKEEPER DESERVES TO BE TREATED “She’s human asyou are-‐ You treat her assich.”‐Kipling. o u r A Timekeeper may be worn on a fob, with or without a safety attachment, but at the very last the best way for a gentleman to carry his watch is on a “ T ” chain, with the watch in his waistcoat pocket. Notice how the conductor carries his watch next time you are on a train. He knows pretty well. 22 A Timekeeper should be wound every morning; A Watch about breakfast time. A watch rests at night just as you do, with the mainspring gradually relaxing, and before starting on another day it should be given the inspiration which a tenser mainspring provides. It’s perfectly safe and better for your watch to let it remain in your pocket over night, provided it will hold the same position that it does in the day time. A watch under a pillow always runs a modicum of danger. If you are very particular about the accuracy of your watch, better let a jeweler set it. He knows how. Reputable jewelers charge nothing for this service‐theyaregladtorenderit. Ajeweleralways admires a m a n who carries a good watch and is care‐ ful of it. If you drop your watch, or if it receives an unusu‐ ally violent jar, don’t assume because it is “still ticking” that it is n o t hurt. It may be knocked completely out of adjustment, and if a Wheel runs out of true for any length of time it will wear its arbor. A l l jewelers know the Hamilton, and if a part is broken, an interchangeable repairing part is sure to be found in their stock. They don’t have to make a new piece. R e s “ A Timekeeper should be looked after to see if 23sz it needs cleaning or oiling about every fifteen to Oiling 23 _ eighteen months. When possible, get the same m a n who sold you your Timekeeper to keep it in condition for you, as the jeweler who sells a watch is always interested in its performance and generally makes no charge for minor repairs. 24 THE TIMEKEEPER PART II 12- Size Thin Model Result of 18 years of training in male‐ i n g accurate Time‐ keepers. IZ-size, thin model, made in open face only. Nickel, br i dge movement, pendant set, 19 extra fine ruby jewels in gold settings, patent mo‐ tor barrel, gold train, steel escape wheel, double roller escapement, sapphire pallets, micrometric regulator, Breguet hairspring, compensation balance, adjusted to temperature, isochronism and five positions. Just as the Cremona violin has been accepted for four centuries as perfection in size, shape and weight, we believe that this Timekeeper will endure as the one right construc‐ tion for a gentleman’s watch. Sold complete only. 14-k. gold, extra heavy, plain . . . $100.00 I4-k. gold, e x t r a heavy, knurledge, plain or engine‐turned . . . . 100.00 14-k. gold, heavy, plain . . . 85.00 I4‐k. gold, heavy, knurl edge, plain or engine-turned . . . 85.00 Hamilton guaranteed gold-filled, plain or enginet-‐urned . . 55.00 Timed and adjustedin thecases at the factory. 30 TIMEKEEPERS Without A Peer I6-size, open‐ face, nickel. bridgemove- ment, pendant or lever set, 23 extra fine ruby jewels in gold settings, patent mot or barrel, escapement cap~ jeweled, st eel escape wheel, double roller escapement, sap‐ phire pallets,mi‐ crometric regu‐ lator, Breguet hairspring, com‐ 31 . $110.00 72.00 I6-size, open-face, nickel, bridge move‐ ment, pendant and lever set, 19 extra fine ruby jewels in gold settings, patent motor barrel, steel escape Wheel, double r o l l e r escapement, sapphire pallets, mi‐ crometric regulator, Breguet hairspring, compensation b a l ‐ a n c e , double-sunk dial, adjusted to tem‐ perature, isochronism and five positions. I4-k. gold, e x t r a heavy, plain or engine‐ turned. . . . . . .$97.50 14-k. gold, heavy, plain or engine‐turned . 82.50 Hamilton guaranteed gold-filled, both open-face joint and swing ring, plain or engine-turned . . . . . . 57.50 Timed and adjusted in the cases at the factory. Those desiring this grade of watch in a less expensive case, or for their own case, can obtain same from any reputable jeweler. 32 “ 9 5 2 Timekeeper is made in both pendant and lever set and has graceful lines and beautiful and accurate mechanism. Made in open-face only. ' "TIMEKEEPERS This bridge model HAMILTON I6-size, open-face, ,, nickel, M‐plate move‐ ment, lever set, 21 extra fine ruby jewels in gold settings, steel escape wheel, double r o l l e r escapement, sapphire pallets, mi‐ crometric regulator, Breguet hairspring, compensation b a l ‐ a n c e , double-sunk dial, adjusted to tem‐ perature, isochronism and five positions. For an unfailing, finely constructed and not too expensive Timekeeper there are none that can compare with our No. 990 at the same price. I4-k. gold, extra heavy, plain or engine-turned . . . . . $95.00 I4-k. gold, heavy, plain or engine‐ turned . . 80.00 Hamilton guaranteed gold-filled, both open-face joint and swing ring, plain or engine-turned . . . 54.00 We supply any style of dial desired for Hamilton Timekeepers. Those desiring this grade of watch in a less expensive case, or for then own case, can obtain same from any reputable jeweler. 33 No-990 16-size, open-face, nickel, %-plate move‐ ment, pendant an d lever set, 17extra fine j ew el s in settings, steel escape w h eel, double roller escape‐ ment , micrometric regulator,Breguet hairspring, compensa‐ tion balance, adjusted to temperature, isoch‐ ronism and five posi‐ tions. We have succeeded in getting the Hamil‐ t o n Timekeeper of this grade recognized as far superior in appearance and performance to other watches of the same general standard at a price within the reach of all. ’ I4-k. gold, extra heavy, plain or engine-turned . . . . . $80.00 I4-k. gold, heavy, plain or engine‐ turned . 64.50 Hamilton guaranteed gold-filled, both open-face joint and swing ring, plain or engine-turned . . . 38.50 ‘ Timed and adjusted in the cases at the factory. 34‐ VTIMEKEEPERS HAMILTON The 16-Size R a i l - M, road Timekeeper of ' America Equipped with Montgomery Nu‐ mercial Dial, “ I t Al‐ most Speaks the Time.” Open-face, nickel, M-plate movement, lever-set, 21 fine ruby jewels in settings, double roller escape‐ ment, steel e s c a p e Wheel , micrometric regulator, Breguet hairspring, d0uble‐ sunk dial, compensation balance, adjusted to tempera‐ ture, isochronism and five positions. Like all Hamiltons, a perfect timepiece. Very popular on all the railroads of America and equally popular with all other m e n who carry it. This watch will be cased by the jeweler in any style case that the purchaser desires. Price, movement only . . . . . . $30.00 No. 993 is same as above for hunting case. Price, movement only . . . . 30.00 Any Railroad Timekeeper we sell we equip with Numerical Dial without extra charge. 35 No. 974 holds its own for time-keeping even in comparison with other watches costing twice as much. This watch will be cased by the jeweler in any style case that purchaser desires. Price, movement only . . I . ”$1500 and upward, according to finish, dial, etc. No. 975, same as above for hunting case, price, movement only . 15.00 and upward according to finish, dial, etc. 36 \ vTIMEKEEPERS I 6-size, open-face, nickel, M-plate movement, pendant andleverset, 17fine jewels in settings, micrometric regula‐ t o r , Breguet hair‐ spring, compen‐ sation balance, ad‐ justed to tempera‐ ture, thoroughly well finished. N o . 974 is a dependable Timekeeper ‐ the kind of watch which HAMILTON O-size, hunting, nickel, bridge movement, pendant set, 19 extra fine ruby jewels in gold settings, patent mo‐ t o r barrel, gold train, steel escape wheel, double roller escapement, sapphire pal‐ lets, micrometric regulator, Breguet hairspring, com‐ pensation balance, adjusted to temperature, isochronism and three positions. I4-k. gold, heavy, plain or engine-turned, hunting . . . . . . .$57.00 I4-k. gold, engraved, hunting . . . . Hamilton guaranteed gold-filled, plain or engine-turned, hunting . . . . . Hamilton guaranteed gold‐filled, engraved 14-k. gold, heavy, plain, open-face . . . Hamilton guaranteed gold-filled, plain, 63.00 45.00 46.50 52.00 open-face . . . . . . . 43.00 Those desiring this grade of watch in a less expensive case, or for their o w n case, can obtain same from any reputable jeweler. We have in process a much smaller open-face ladies’ watch which will be completed during 1912, and, like all Hamiltons, will be a fine timekeeper. 37 O-size, hunting, nickel bridge move‐ ment, pendant set, 17 extra fine ruby jewels in gold settings, steel escape wheel, double r 01l er escapement, sapphire pallets, mi‐ crometric regulator, Breguet hairspring, compensation balance, adjusted to temperature, isoch‐ ronism and three positions. I4-k. gold, heavy, plain or engine-turned, hunting . . . . . .$50.00 I4‐k. gold, engraved, hunting . . 56.00 Hamilton guaranteed gold-filled, plain or engine-turned, hunting . . 40.00 Hamilton guaranteed gold-filled, engraved hunting. . . . 41.50 14-k. gold, heavy, open-face, plain . . . 4.8.00 Hamilton guaranteed gol-dfilled, plain, open‐face . . . . 39.00 Our ladies’ watches are built for service. The requirements for them are as exacting as for our gentlemen’s high-grade watches. Made in hunting case and open-face, the open-face being without seconds hand. Timed and adjusted in the cases at the factory. Those desiring this grade of watchm a less expensive case, or for their o w n case, can obtain same from any reputable jeweler. 38 TIMEKEEPERS I8-size, open‐ face, nickel, 23 extra fine ruby jewels in gold set‐ tings, patent m 0 ‐ t o r barrel, double roller escapement, steel escape wheel, sapphire pallets, patent micromet‐ ric regulator, Bre‐ g u e t hairspring, double-sunk dial, beautifully finished n i ck e1 plates, gilt letter‐ ing, steel parts chamfered; ad‐ . $40.00 40.00 H A M I L T ON TIMEKEEPERS No. 94-0. The Eighteen‐ Size Railroad Time‐ keeper of America. 18-size, open‐ face, 21 extra fine ruby jewels, pat‐ ent motor barrel, nickel, adjusted to temperature, isochronism and five positions, double roller escapement, steel escape w h eel, The 940 Hamilton has the most phenomenally accurate time-keeping records, is more extensively used and in far greater numbers on all main railroad lines of America than any other watch. This watch will be cased by the jeweler in any style case that the purchaser desires. Price, movement only . . . ”$2800 No. 941 is same asabove for hunting case, price, movement only . . . . . 28.00 40 y, ‘ No.940 spring, patent micrometric regulator, double-sunk dial, gilt lettering, beautifully and elegantly damas‐ keened. Breguet hair‐ H A M I LT ON , TIMEKEEPERS 18-size, open‐ face, nickel, 19 fine ruby jewels, patent motor bar‐ rel, double roller escapement, steel escape wheel, Breguet hair‐ spring, patent micrometric regu‐ lator, double-sunk dial, beautifully and elegantly damaskeened, ad‐ justed to tempera‐ ture, isochronism and five positions. No. 944 Some men not connected with railroading like to carry a railroad watch just the same. This Time‐ keeper will meet their demand with the same close and accurate performance that it gives to railroad men all over America. Made in open-face only. This watch will be cased by the jeweler in any style case that the purchaser desires. Price, movement only .. . . .$28.00 41 N°- 936 This Timekeeper receives the same careful atten‐ tion that is given to all Hamilton Timekeepers. This watch will be cased by the jeweler in any style case that the purchaser desires. Price, movement only . . . . $24.00 No. 937 is same asabove for hunting case, price, movement only . . 24.00 42 TI MEKEEPERS 18-size, open‐ face, 17 jewels, nickeI, adjusted t 0 temperature, isochronism and five positions, double roller escapement, steel escape Wheel, Bre‐ guet hairspring, patent regulator, double-sunk dial, beautifully dam‐ askeened. ,f w, accuracy and dependability. This watch will be cased by the jeweler1nany style case that the purchaser desires. Price, movement only . ” $ 1 225 and upward, according to finish, dial, etc. No. 925 is same as above for hunting case, price, movement only . . 122.25 and upward, according to finish dial, etc 43 \ 18-size, open‐ face, I7 jewel, nickel, Breguet hairspring, patent regulator. HAMILTON Thename Hamilton on the dial of any Time‐ keeper is as defi‐ nite assurance of accuracy as is the blue sign “set hourly by tele‐ graph” on a clock. No. 924. is carefully con‐ structed and ad- ‐ justed and is 110.924 lacking in no feature that is necessary to insure